Fever

Fever

What is a fever?

A fever is a rise in body temperature above the normal body temperature of about 37 C.  It can vary by up to a degree either way depending on the person, what they’ve been doing and time of day.

Body temperature is different depending on how you take it.  Armpit and forehead temperatures are half a degree lower than oral temperature and ear and rectal temperatures are about half a degree higher than oral temperature.

Symptoms of a fever

  • Feeling hot and clammy
  • Red face
  • Shivering

Causes of a fever

Fevers are usually caused by infections.  Infections can be caused by bacteria or by viruses.  A mild fever is part of how our body fights infection.

Heat stroke is another cause of fever.

Treatment of a fever

  • Drink water but avoid caffeinated drinks and alcohol
  • Take paracetamol preferably or ibuprofen
  • Have a tepid (lukewarm) bath

When to see your Doctor if you have a fever

  • If a baby is under 6 months old
  • If a child has had a fever for more than 1 day despite using paracetamol
  • If an adult has had a fever for more than 3 days despite taking paracetamol
  • If temperature is above 40C
  • If the person is unable to eat or drink
  • If the person can’t stop shaking
  • If you have other severe symptoms such as racing heart, muscle spasms, confusion, trouble breathing, severe headache
  • If you have recently bene overseas

When to go to the hospital if you have a fever

  • If you also have a stiff neck
  • If you have a rash that does not change when you press on it
  • If your child is in pain
  • If your child can’t move properly or has muscle twitches

 

Ask the Pharmacist

Ask the Pharmacist

It’s live! I am very proud to announce that the “Ask the Pharmacist” app is live!

 

Visit the website

www.askthepharmacist.com.au

 

A lot of hard work has gone in to this.
Thank you Ollie Cloud Concepts Australia Pty Ltd.
Please save the app to your phone home screen or desktop to use when you need it and ask away. I will answer any question that you would ask a Pharmacist, which is pretty much anything!
I would also be very grateful if you could share this.
I welcome any feedback you have.
Thank you!

Novel coronavirus

Novel coronavirus

Coronavirus is a word that we have all heard mentioned lately.

What is a coronavirus?

Coronaviruses are a group of viruses that can make us sick (animals too).  Some coronaviruses cause mild illness, like the common cold, and others can make people very sick like SARS did several years ago.

A novel coronavirus is a new virus which means that it has not been seen before this outbreak occurred.

Why is a new virus bad?

New viruses can affect more people as no one has immunity to them.

Viruses are present in our communities all the time and because we have some exposure to them our immune system can build up some immunity to them so that we don’t get as sick and we recover faster. There is no vaccination for a virus that is new and there is no immunity to it present in our immune systems.

Is it likely that I will catch novel coronavirus?

Unless you have been to China this year or have come in to close contact with someone who has it is very unlikely that you will catch it.

How is novel coronavirus spread?

As with other viral illnesses it is spread by an infected person coughing or sneezing on someone else or on a surface that is touched by someone else.

How can I avoid catching coronavirus?

It is always important to have good hygiene to prevent the spread of this and other illnesses.  This includes washing hands well with soap and water and coughing or sneezing into a tissue or your elbow if you don’t have a tissue.

Can novel coronavirus be treated?

There is no treatment for this.  Antibiotics do not work on viruses.

For more information visit the Australian Government Department of Health website

https://www.health.gov.au/health-topics/novel-coronavirus-2019-ncov